Benoît Gosselin, Director

    Benoit Gosselin obtained Ph.D. degree in Electrical Eng. from École Polytechnique Montréal, Canada, in 2009. He was an NSERC Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Georgia Institute of Technology in 2010. He is currently heading the Biomedical Microsystems Lab at the Depart. of ECE of Université Laval, which includes more than 12 researchers in the area of new medical technologies and micro-nanosystems. His research program is multidisciplinary and concentrates on creating innovative biomedical microsystems dedicated to improve healthcare and accelerate discoveries in medical research. Notably, he created several implantable/wearable wireless microelectronic devices to retrieve weak amplitude bioelectrical signals from different types of electrodes. His research interests cover biomedical instrumentation, wireless integrated circuits and microsystems, implantable microelectronic systems, brain computer interfaces and low-power analog/mixed-mode integrated circuits design. His research has contributed more than 50 journal and conference articles, 4 book chapters and 3 patents. Dr Gosselin organized and chaired sessions in several international conferences, and he served on organization committees as well. He is Chapter Chair of the IEEE Computer Society, Quebec Section and he is member of the IEEE EMBS and the IEEE CASS.

    Abdollah Mirbozorgi, PhD Student

    Biography:

    Abdollah Mirbozorgi was born in Karaj, Iran, in 1980. He received the B.S. degree in electrical engineering from Noshirvani University of Technology, Babol, Mazandaran, Iran, in 2008, the M.S. degree in electrical engineering from Ferdowsi University of Mashhad (FUM), Iran, 2011, and is currently pursuing the Ph.D. degree at Microelectronic Lab, Laval University, Quebec, Canada. His main research interests are neural and bionic implants, wireless implantable biomedical systems, integrated analog circuit design, and wireless power and data transmission.

    Abstract of current project:

    Emerging brain-interfacing technology has a tremendous potential for the advancement of knowledge and for the development of useful clinical applications. In recent years, although there has been major progress on implantable biomedical systems in order to support most of the functionalities of wireless implantable devices, these devices remain mostly restricted to research, in part due to limited miniaturization, power supply constraints, and lack of a reliable interface between implants and external devices. Currently I’m working on design and implementation of a high-performance wireless interface to address such limitations (power and data transmission) for multi-channel neural recording and stimulating implants.

    Hadi Bahrami, PhD Student

    Biography:

    Hadi Bahrami was born in Shiraz, Iran, in 1980. He received the B.S. and M.S. degree in electrical engineering 2005 and 2007 from Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, Iran and Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Iran respectively and he is currently pursuing the Ph.D. degree at Microelectronic Lab, Laval University, Quebec, Canada. His main research interests are neural and bionic implants, wireless implantable biomedical systems, integrated RF and optical circuit design, antenna & propagation and digital communication.

    Abstract of current project:

    There is growing interest for implantable transmitters to extract the raw electrophysiological data gathered from miniature monitoring implanted systems. These emerging devices are crucial components in the development of new medical applications targeted at diagnostic and treatment of neurological diseases and/or at control of prosthetic devices. Ultra-wideband (UWB) signals are transmitted in the unlicensed Federal Communications Commission (FCC) approved frequency range (3.1-10.6 GHz). Currently I’m working on design and implementation of a high-performance wireless interface to address such limitations for multi-channel neural recording and stimulating implants.

    Mouhamad Al-Yassine, MSc Student

    Biography:

    Mouhamad Al-Yassine was born in Oyyoun, Akkar, Lebanon, in 1990. He received the B.E from Beirut Arab University, Lebanon, in 2012. He is currently at the M.Sc. with the Biomedical Microsystems Lab, Laval University under supervision of Prof. Benoit Gosselin. His research interests include design of an Optical Link for Low Power, High Data Rate Telemetry using VCSEL.

    Abstract of current project:

    Neural system offers the promise for diagnosing brain diseases, as well as detecting and identifying neural patterns which are specific to a behavioral phenomenon. Neural pattern classification and recognition require simultaneous recording from large number of neurons, High speed communication between an implanted device and an external device, and data rate of wireless communication from Mbps range to tens of Mbps. These demands bring a great challenge when realized with low power requirements.

    Carl Poirier, MSc Student

    Biography:

    Carl Poirier was born in Quebec, Canada in 1990. He graduated from Université Laval in 2013 in computer engineering. He has now undertaken a Msc at the Biomedical Microsystems Lab, under supervision of Prof. Paul Fortier and Prof. Benoît Gosselin.

    Abstract of current project:

    With the advent of high-throughput DNA sequencing, faster and more accessible assembling software have to follow. Currently, such computation is typically done on supercomputers, thus is not available to all researchers, and takes several hours. With better algorithms and cutting-edge programming tools, it is feasible to pack this calculation on accelerator-equipped desktop computers.

    Hassan Sepehrian, PhD Student

    Biography:

    Hassan Sepehrian was born in Baladeh Noor, Mazandaran, Iran, in 1984. He received the B.Sc. from Shahed University of Tehran, Iran, in 2008 and M.Sc. degrees with honor from Ferdowsi University of Mashhad (FUM), Mashhad, Iran, in 2010, both in electronics engineering. After 3 years of working as an Integrated Circuit designer at NRP Co., Tehran, Iran. He is currently at the PhD with the Biomedical Microsystems Lab, Laval University under supervision of Prof. Benoit Gosselin. His research interests include design of analog and mixed-signal integrated circuits and systems, data converters, and low power implantable biomedical circuits and microsystems.

    Abstract of current project:

    Recent neural interface research on human and non-human primates has shown great promise for next generation Brain Machine Interfaces (BMIs) for advanced Human prostheses, while also showing potential in the diagnosis and prediction of neurological events. This is creating a demand for low-power body-implanted electronic microsystems that can simultaneously record neurophysiological signals from large numbers of single neurons across a wide range of spatial and temporal scales and also stimulate brain cells. Currently I’m working on design and implementation of a neural recording microsystem to satisfy these new demands.